Rubbers

Overview

The hardness of most rubbers is specified using the Shore A scale (while the Shore D scale is used for harder materials). There are formulas (Wikipedia’s version, 3D Vision’s  version) which gives an equation to convert Shore A hardness values into a Youngs Modulus, useful when you want to calculate the force required to compress the rubber by a certain amount. Each version of the equation gives different results, so treat the values with caution.

Nitrile Rubber

Nitrile is has a better resistance to fuel than Neoprene. It is also slightly more expensive (see the Price Guide). Unique property is that you can get it in white

Stats:

P = poor, F = fair, G = good, E = excellent

Property Value
Hardness (Shore A) 60
Usable Temperature Range (C) -40 to 101.7
Max Tensile Strength (MPa) 7.0 to 24.6
Abrasion G
Tear Resistance F
Electrical Insulation P
Flame Resistance P
Ozone Resistance F
UV Resistance G
Acid Resistance G
Solvent Resistance P
Oil Resistance E

Price Guide

Thickness (mm) Price (NZ$, as of 2012, exc. GST)
1.5 235.80
3.0 455.70
4.5 697.30
6 865.11
10 1441.86

Neoprene Rubber

Neoprene is a very popular rubber due to it’s good fuel, flame and sunlight resistance. Cheaper than Nitrile rubber (see the Price Guide).

Stats:

P = poor, F = fair, G = good, E = excellent

Property Value
Hardness (Shore A) 60
Usable Temperature Range (C) -45.6 to 126.7
Max Tensile Strength (MPa) 17.6 to 21
Abrasion G
Tear Resistance G
Electrical Insulation F
Flame Resistance E
Ozone Resistance E
UV Resistance G
Acid Resistance G
Solvent Resistance G
Oil Resistance G

Price Guide:

Thickness (mm) Price (NZ$, as of 2012, exc. GST)
1.5 225.69
3.0 387.71
4.5 668.37
6 775.43
10 1133.23

 

Suppliers

NZ Rubber And Foam